archiemcphee:

The Japanese city of Nara is renown for its deer. Thanks to their legendary history, they’re regarded as heavenly animals, messengers of the gods according to Shinto belief, and guardians of both the city and Japan itself. A population of over 1000 remarkably tame Sika Deer reside in Nara Park, where they roam freely and visitors may feed them special biscuits, and every summer they do something strange and awesome. They leave the park and swarm the streets, lounging together on the sidewalks and sometimes right in the road, looking like they haven’t got a care in the world and the middle of the road is the perfect place to be.

YouTube user Blue Bells 9999 shot video of this marvelous phenomenon in 2013 and describes it as a regular occurrence in late July:

"…with the deer strolling out of the park to “enjoy the coolness of the street.” Given that the concrete sidewalk and asphalt road surface would ordinarily retain heat during the summertime, we’re guessing that the surrounding cityscape and topography creates either a cooling wind tunnel or an inviting patch of shade.

Although it might seem like an alarming event, Nara residents seem very used to the presence of the deer. It’s been happening for so long now that the city posts warning signs to drivers about deer crossing the road. No one honks at them or suddenly swerves to avoid them. We’d be so amazed by the sight of them that people would be honking at us for blocking traffic ourselves.

[via RocketNews24]

(via darksilenceinsuburbia)

10 hours ago 1,489 notes

vintagebooksdesign:

VINTAGE CHILDREN’S CLASSICS

It has been two years since we first revealed the series design for our Vintage Children’s Classics. The list continues to grow and we are excited to take this opportunity to share some of our more recent additions.

You can see our first two ‘colour wheels’ here and here.

(via unboundbooks)

1 day ago 760 notes

#172. Write about the seediest place in heaven. What do the dare devils of the after life do for fun? What is the nightlife like?

"You’ve Hit the Big Time Baby" by Thomas Hawk via photopin

3 days ago 6 notes

apolonisaphrodisia:

Robin Wight  (via This is Colossal)

(via lifeincsharpmajor)

4 days ago 18,253 notes

'Did you get it?' : Novels & Their Multiple Interpretations

I first read The Catcher in the Rye in middle school. I was a “voracious reader” according to one of my English teachers and so I’d devoured over half of the small in class library before I finally stumbled across or was recommended (my memory is a little fuzzy here) The Catcher in the Rye. I remember not being particularly impressed with the cover art or rather, the lack thereof, but I stuck with my decision to give it a chance and I will never regret that choice. The Catcher in the Rye is easily one of my top ten books. 

Read More

4 days ago 3 notes

lupinatic:

here-is-the-place:

When people say these books are children’s books, as if to demean them, I balk. These books dealt with themes that adults do not fully understand or wish to. It dealt with racism, classism, sexism, homophobia, prejudice, and general ignorance. These books taught us that it doesn’t matter how you were raised, but that you get to choose to be kind, loyal, brave, and true. They taught us to be strong under the pressures of this world and to hold fast to what we know to be right. These books taught me so much, they changed me as a person. So just because they’re set against a fantastical backdrop with young protagonists does not mean that their value is any less real.

This.

First book: Starts with the double murder of a pair of twenty-one year olds who were much missed and leaving their baby son a war orphan. A child growing up in abusive conditions that would give Cinderella the horrors. Dealing with peers and teachers who are bullies. The fickleness of fame (from the darling of Gryffindor to the outcast.) The idea that there are things worth fighting and dying for, spoken by the child protagonist. Three children promptly acting on that willingness to sacrifice their lives, and two of them getting injured doing so.

Second book: The equivalent of racism with the pro-pureblood attitude. Plot driven by an eleven year old girl being groomed and then used by a charming, handsome older male. The imbalance of power and resultant abuse inherent in slavery. Fraud perpetuated by stealing something very intimate.

Third book: The equivalent of ableism with a decent, kind and competant adult being considered less than human because he has an illness that adversely affects his behaviour at certain times. A justice system that is the opposite of just. Promises of removing an abused child from the abusive environment can’t always be kept. The innocent suffer while the guilty thrive.

Fouth book: More fickleness of fame. The privileged mistreating and undermining the underprivileged because they can. A master punishing a slave for his own misjudgment, and the slave blaming herself. A sports tournament which involves mortal risk being cheered by spectators. A wonderful young man being murdered simply because he was in the way. A young boy being tortured, humilated and nearly murdered.

Fifth book: PTSD in the teenage protagonist. Severe depression in the protagonist’s godfather, triggered by inherited mental health issues and being forced to stay in a house where abuse occured. A bigoted tyrant who lives to crush everyone under her heel, torturing a teenager for telling the truth in the name of the government (and trying to suck his soul out too). The discovery that your idols can have feet of clay after all. An effort to save the life of someone dear and precious actually costing that very same life. The loss of a father-figure and the resultant guilt.

Sixth book: The idea that a soul can be broken beyond repair. Drugs with the potential for date rape are shown as having achieved exactly that in at least one case, resulting in a pregnancy. Well-meaning chauvinism trying to control the love life of a young woman. Internalised prejuidce resulting in refusing the one you love, not out of lack of love but out of fear of tainting them. The mortality of those that seem powerful and larger than life.

Seventh book: Bad situations can get worse, to the point where even the privileged end up suffering and afraid. More internalised prejudice and fear hysterical terror of tainting those you love. Self-sacrifice and the loss of loved ones, EVERYWHERE. Those who are bitter are often so with a reason. The necessity of defeating your inner demons, even though it’s never as cool as it sounds. Don’t underestimate those that are enslaved. Other people’s culture isn’t always like your own. Things often come full circle (war ending with the death of a dearly-loved pair of new parents and their orphaned baby son living with his dead mother’s blood relative instead of his young godfather). Even if ‘all is well’ the world is still imperfect, because it’s full of us brilliant imperfect humans.

So… still think that Harry Potter is a kid’s series with no depth?

(via mariethelibrarian)

5 days ago 247,211 notes

cumberrage:

cumberbatchaddictsanonymous:

Oh my god, tag your porn there are 12.9 year olds here!

 So goddamn beautiful.

(via mariethelibrarian)

5 days ago 112,515 notes

#171. Write about someone who drowns and, instead of death, escapes to another world. This person, instead of dying and floating, reaches the bottom of the lake and disappears. The death becomes something of an urban legend around the town. What happens when someone tries to do the same and sees someone matching the description of the missing person in the water? 

"underwater dream II" by i k o via photopin

5 days ago 12 notes

hope-in-every-book:

svyalitchat:

The #SVYALit Project: Using YA Lit to talk about sexual violence and consent in the lives of teens. Here are a few book lists and book reviews.

Because No Always Mean No, a list of books dealing with sexual assault  
Take 5: Difficult books on an important topic (sexual violence)
Take 5: Sexual Violence in the Life of Boys  
Book Review: The Gospel of Winter by Brendan Kiely 
Thinking About Boys, Sex, and Sex & Violence by Carrie Mesrobian 
What Happens Next by Colleen Clayton 
Plus One by Elizabeth Fama
September Girls by Bennett Madison  
Discussing THE S WORD by Chelsea Pitcher, a guest post by Lourdes Keochgerien
5 Reasons I Loved Faking Normal by Courtney C. Stevens
Charm and Strange by Stephanie Khuen
The Truth About Alice by Jennifer Mathieu
The Winner’s Curse by Marie Rutkoski
Uses for Boys by Erica Loraine Scheidt
Killer Instinct by S. E. Green

Live Through This by Mindi Scott

Sex/Consent Positive Titles: Karen’s List Christa’s List Carrie’s List

See the complete #SVYALit Project Index Here: http://www.teenlibrariantoolbox.com/2014/02/svyalit-project-index.html

This is important. Could very well help those struggling to read these books. Don’t leave anyone in the dark.

because it is always important for us to know that there are authors out there writing about these issues.

(via mariethelibrarian)

6 days ago 2,653 notes
Hi, I'm editing a book and I'm currently using Word, but I think it has limited features for the task, and I wanted to know if you know of any software I can download for free that would have more features then adding comments and highlighting [like letting me change the color of the comment box, and such]. Thank you ♥
Anonymous

thewritingcafe:

These are helpful:

  • StyleWriter 4 is fantastic. It’s an add-on for Microsoft word and has a 14-day trial period. It goes through your text, picks out “glue words”, misspellings, long sentences, homonyms, passive tense, shows your reading grade level, and more.
  • Editminion *FREE* checks for adverbs, weak words, passive voice, cliches, and homonyms among other things.
  • Pro Writing Aid is another online editor. It is mostly free, but offers more features if you pay.
  • AutoCrit offers free analysis for under 500 words, otherwise you have to pay for more text and more editing features.
  • Paper Rater offers a free service for editing, but it is designed for essays.

But they’re mostly for spelling and grammar. I don’t know of anything that allows you to add more comments and stuff, unless you have a tablet, a tablet pen, a pdf version of your manuscript, and a program that allows you to draw on it.